Latin

Latin 4 / AP Latin

Type: honors available Available to: all qualified students, see placement requirements link on the World Language Department page This course is the culmination of the students’ previous years of study. They will learn to translate, analyze, and respond to prose and poetry as mature Latin readers through the in-depth study of Caesar’s Bellum Gallicum and Vergil’s Aeneid. They practice translating Latin at sight and scanning dactylic hexameter. In preparation for the AP Exam, students in this section also write analytical essays on passages from Caesar and Vergil.

Latin 3 / Latin 3 Honors

Type: honors available Available to: all qualified students, see placement requirements link on the World Language Department page Students in Latin 3 continue to explore the Latin language through the daily reading of complex Latin passages, as well as through grammar and vocabulary exercises. Students also continue to critically examine Rome’s role in the Mediterranean by focusing on the Roman army and the campaigns of Vespasian and Titus in Judea. Lastly, they learn about the city of Rome itself.

Latin 2 / Latin 2 Honors

Type: honors available Available to: all qualified students, see placement requirements on the World Language Department page In this second-year course, students continue to refine their understanding of the Latin language through the daily reading of increasingly more difficult Latin passages. Exercises in grammar and vocabulary deepen their understanding of the language. Students continue to study the history of Rome with a focus on the great fire of 64 CE, as well as Roman culture, namely theater, country estates, and marriage customs.

Latin 1

Available to: all students In this first-year course, students learn Latin grammar and vocabulary by reading and translating Latin every day. Through grammar and vocabulary exercises they deepen their understanding of the language. The course also introduces students to the culture and history of ancient Rome with an overview of Roman history and an introduction to the living conditions of people in the city itself. Throughout the course, students are challenged to critically examine connections between Roman and modern culture.

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