Grade 11 – History

Stevenson Summer US History

Type: summer Available to: high school students who have completed grade 10 Schedule: three and a half hours a day, five days a week for five weeks in the summer Special Notes: Students taking this course are still expected to take a full load of courses in the following year. The course is in-person and our dorms are closed, so students must provide their own housing and meals. In this survey course, students investigate significant events and people in United States history from the 15th century to the present. While organized chronologically, this course also focuses on several themes that reverberate throughout the American experience: American and national identity; labor­ both free and enslaved; migration and settlement; politics and power; and geography and the environment. Students learn to focus their analysis of vital social, cultural, political, and economic moments in history by examining how these moments shape our perspective [...]

US History / AP US History

Type: honors available Available to: grade 11 students, grade 12 students in special cases, for honors see placement requirements link on the History Department page In this survey course, students investigate significant events, individuals, and processes in United States history from the 16th century to the present. While organized chronologically, this course also focuses on several themes that reverberate throughout the American experience: American and national identity; labor–– both free and enslaved; migration and settlement; politics and power; and geography and the environment. Throughout the year, course concepts resonate with literary analysis and cultural themes discussed in English 3 and English 3 Honors. Students learn to focus their analysis of vital social, cultural, political, and economic moments in history by examining how they shape our perspective on current social, economic, and political issues. Students develop and use the skills and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources [...]

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